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Autor Thema: LOTR on Amazon Prime  (Gelesen 410 mal)

Walküre

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LOTR on Amazon Prime
« am: 7. Mär 2019, 23:48 »
LORD OF THE RINGS

***

AMAZON SERIES

Zitat
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.




I salute you, honourable Edain gentlemen. Tidings may have reached your ears that a new LOTR series is in the making, by the busy hands of Amazon Prime. It is reported that Amazon is more than adamant in its will to give life to a colossal masterpiece-series; one that could rival with the likes of Game of Thrones and other recent fantasy classics. 250 million dollars have already been given out to obtain the rights for the materials we all love and cherish; furthermore, they speak of a total amount of 1 billion dollars that the company is ready to invest to ensure that the final five-season project will be a success. And, if we know for sure that sums of that magnitude do not by themselves guarantee a prosperous future, we nonetheless get to assume and somehow predict that great things have been planned with care.

When The Hobbit trilogy was first released, almost seven years ago, such magnificent opportunity to immerse oneself in Middle-earth's events once more had rekindled interest and passion around this beautiful, epic, and vast story. Notwithstanding flaws and quality shortcomings, I believe many would share the opinion that Tolkien-inspired works are seldom an uninteresting occasion, especially when the premise lying behind surpasses the wildest positive expectations! The maps they have so far posted look incredibly well-made and so revelatory: a series which might encompass a long arch of wide-ranging sagas, from the rise and downfall of Númenor, to the defeat of the Dark Lord during the Last Alliance wars. Whether we are bound to see the mighty palaces of the Star-island or the diaphanous harbours of Eressëa, this only the coming months shall tell ;)

As for our joyous community, since all these bits seem to bode well, I reckon that opening this thread will absolutely be equally beneficial for us. A place in which every single thought, speculation, or discussion of ours is welcome and greatly appreciated. Our past Hobbit topic was a forge of marvellous ideas and debates. May it be so again, hoping that brighter days will be ahead of us :)
« Letzte Änderung: 8. Mär 2019, 12:01 von Walküre »

Walküre

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Re: LOTR on Amazon Prime
« Antwort #1 am: 11. Mär 2019, 18:19 »
Below follows a very dense comment of mine from Discord, expressing my utmost wish to see the Undying Lands in the upcoming series and the arguments advocating for such a choice. I went through quite a few points, encompassing several themes and topical landmark events in the lore. I hope this meandering dissertation will captivate your interest and kindle some tiny shreds of curiosity in you all. Good read ;)

(Thank you for the inspiration, Oak)

Zitat
1. Yes, I long to see some solid footage of the Undying Lands from the depth of my heart. Some consistent scenes that are hopefully to be more concrete than nebulous silhouettes, covered by the mists of western seas. A map of those immortal places could do, indeed.

2. One recurrent mistake many people fall prey of is the incorrect belief that Valinor exists as the stereotypical archetype of a paradise; timeless, immersed in perennial light, spaceless and totally abstract. This is not an appropriate portrait, though. The Blessed Realm is not the real Heaven (where Ilúvatar dwells), but is rather meant to represent an Eden-like terrestrial paradise. Aman is in fact an own physical continent, with its relative perilous locations and other geographical particularities. Funnily enough, outside of the Pelóri (out of the evergreen Plains of Valinórë, in the strictest sense), the Immortal Continent harbours some of the deadliest places in Arda (frozen wastelands in the North or dreary strands in the South, with the southern caverns being the one-time grim lair of Ungoliant). So, I want to see a decent degree of differentiation and solidity, rather than a solely-astral, dreamlike portrayal. Sure, Valinor is the most heavenly and holiest realm on earth, full of primeval wonders and unspeakable miracles, yet also differs from the 'heaven-amid-clouds' imagery fixed in the common perception.

3. Reconnecting with the previous point, nowhere in Aman can Men live forever or hope to escape the inexorable passing of time. This is because, as it's stated in the Númenor chapter of the Silmarillion, it's the Immortals who live there that have sanctified those shires, and not the opposite (the Undying Lands conferring immortality to its inhabitants). The latter was a terrible misconception that Sauron used as a potent lever, in order to sway the king towards open rebellion against Valinor, since the monarch yearned for the endless life of Elves and Ainur. This passage might be explored by the series; it has to be, I mean.

4. Because of the series' own setting, all these themes are extremely relevant, now more than ever. In the Third Age, the Ancient West is separated from the world and is therefore not a part of Arda anymore. I imagine it being, in accordance to the canons, a sort of flat, Asgard-like continental mass, floating on forbidden oceans lying in the sidereal ways of Eä (the outer space), whereas Middle-earth and the other territories consisted of a round celestial orb. No wonder why Valinor was thereby deemed an even farther, mystical and mythic reality, as though it had never truly existed. Conversely, in the Second Age Aman was still in Arda and could be normally reached via sailing, had the Valar not barred mortals from taking those routes. Ergo: the Undying Lands were much more real and tangible, back then.

5. Ar-Pharazôn's landing on Aman is one of the most topical passages of the lore. His huge fleets approached, while the Holy Mountain stood terrible, eternal, imperturbable and unchanged, instilling terror in Men. The king even managed to conquer Eldamar, laying siege to Kôr. The Elves had already fled behind the Pelóri; then, Manwë, from the highest peak, relinquished his delegated powers on Arda, thus temporarily renouncing his dominion of the world. Going through those tense pages, you get the idea that the Valar themselves, beside being unwilling to exterminate the invaders, feared that so formidable an army (the enemy army) could have perhaps brought ruin inside Valinor itself. This gives the idea of the formidable arsenal of Númenor in her prime! The sequence would just be phenomenal to watch, don't you think?